Learn poetry writing with these simple steps

Poetry, a beautiful form of writing which everyone adores, right? Sounds intellectual, feels lovely! Oh, what a wonder is a poetry!

Oops! I started writing poetry by mistake 😃. Once one starts writing poetry it’s hard to stop. Because once we explore the beauty of poetry, it is hard to ignore. True that, who am I to tell this?

To begin with, I am definitely not a brilliant writer but I have been writing poetry for many years now. That being said, I think I can share you some of my personal tips, if you are willing to write an amazing poetry, especially for beginners.

So, let’s get into the topic. Firstly, to write anything, it is important that we understand what form and tone of writing is ours. One definitely can experiment with these but there might be something that is your strong point. Utilise the same to create a poetry. But if we do not write one before knowing the tone, how can we even explore what’s our style?

I meant to say that you may write small phrases or stories or quotes or anything else so that you can understand what your style is.

Now that you know what your style is, sit and start writing something.

What do I write about?

If you are a beginner, keep it simple! You don’t have to write brilliant things to make your poetry wonderful. Poetry is about emotions and opinions. In laymen words, if you are willing to write about feeling dizzy, make sure your readers also feel dizzy when they are reading your poetry.

How to write a poetry?

There is a misconception that if you are writing a poetry, it has to rhyme on every sentence. But that’s not true. You must definitely read about different forms of poetry writing to understand this part.

Simple tips to write a poetry

This all sounded a little easier said than done type right? Don’t worry, I have got you covered!

Remember these points while you are a poetry

Avoid writing cliches!

Make it understandable

Keep it creative

Use the magic of words

Play with the imagination of reader

Keep your motive clear

It is definitely not as simple as it sounds but once you get your flow, nothing can stop you.

One shall definitely make mistakes but remember there is nothing like a perfect piece of writing!

To learn more about content writing, read this

Law or flaw?
Judiciary or is some kind of a mockery?
To the brother who’s serving a life sentence;
for the crime he did not do;
That night will forever be of repentance.

The mother who taught him how to walk;
Has got such a shock;
Half of her body is permanently into shock

The father who gifted him his first car;
Is too old & poor to fight
& had to sell the roof which protected them;
From the bright sunlight.

The sister who’s an aspiring lawyer;
Has lost all hopes on the system;
For here innocents are the victims.

And the innocent who is spending his days;
In a 6*6 feet black hole
Is losing the power over his soul;
And for what?
For the doubts in the caste and religion.

So my dear friends,
What and for whom is the evidence?
To be fabricated? To be planted by the money & power holders?
Or for the law to behold the truth?

This poem is a tribute to Mohammad Nisarudin and many more innocents who spend their lives in the jails being the prisoners of the system.


Who was Mohammad Nisarudin and story of few others……

On January 15, 1994, Mohammad Nisarudin was at home in Gulbarga, Karnataka, preparing for his Diploma in Pharmacy final exams, 15 days away. After he qualified, the 19-year-old planned to get a job in one of the Gulf countries, a dream he and his best friend Sajid (name changed) had talked about since they were seven. But that day, the police knocked at the door of his parents’ home and took him away in handcuffs. Initially, the police booked him for a bomb blast that had taken place in October 1993 in a Muslim educational institute in Hyderabad, then he was booked in a few unsolved bomb blasts that had taken place in August and September in 1993, then he was booked under the anti-terror law Terrorist and Disruptive Activities (Prevention) Act (TADA) — which was repealed two years later, in 1996 — for planting the bombs that took two lives and injured 22 in five trains on December 5 and 6 1993 in Mumbai, and after a ‘confession,’ put into Ajmer Central Jail. On February 28, 2005, a TADA court at Ajmer convicted him and gave him a life sentence.
On May 11 2016, the Supreme Court ruled that his confession, which was taken in police custody, was totally inadmissible, acquitted him of all charges and set aside his life sentence.
While the length of Mr Nisarudin’s incarceration is extreme, his isn’t an isolated case.

Take Abdul Wahid Din Mohammad Shaikh, 39 now. He was charged of complicity in the Mumbai train blasts of November 7, 2006 and spent nine years in Arthur Road Jail in Mumbai before being acquitted of all charges — the only one of those accused to be acquitted — and released. Mr. Shaikh told The Hindu that all the accused were made to sign many documents, some of which were blank. “Had I known the consequences I would have never done so.” While in jail, he enrolled in a law course, and finished a course in journalism. If he knew something of the law at the time he was arrested, he said, “I would have known what a confession is, what the consequences of signing on any written or blank pages are, what is the rights of an accused are, what the rights of those arrested are, what the duties of an investigating officer and agency are.”

And there is Adnan Mulla, 40, who was sentenced to 10 years for the Mulund blasts of March 1, 2003. Initially he was illegally detained in 2003 and not released because the police wanted to make him a witness. Then he was made an accused after he refused to give a statement against his brother-in-law of Saquib Nachan (former general secretary of the now-banned Students Islamic Movement of India, SIMI). “I spent six years and one month in jail,” he says. Throughout his incarceration, he was kept in the cell, an egg-shaped high-security block. “I was going to get married the same month I was picked up,” he says. “My fiancée waited for seven years for me to be released. Only I know how much she and both our families suffered. How can the loss of time be compensated by any officer or government?”

Who is the system for? Why is the system even their when they take their own sweet time and do not care for the innocents?

Full story: https://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/mumbai/prisoners-of-the-system/article17333262.ece

Instead of sleeping for some human hours,
I woke up to a phone call, invading my privacy.
Because this person wanted to push away the burdens,
The burdens that he is carrying on his head.

I was readily available and accessible,
An I have a problem saying no.
Because of this problem I have,
I have to sacrifice the highest of all virtues; privacy!

Privacy that I have none,
Available, that I’m to almost everybody.
I wake up to whinging of people’s problems,
I sleep after exhausting on them.

Finally, when I’m free to care my own,
My door gets knocked by a bunch of someone else’s.
Not a believer, but is this karma?
This invasion is what I have brought upon myself.

Thinking of finding a cure,
I began to say “No, leave me be.”
But here I go after an hour of deluding privacy,
The intrusion has found a new disguise to get my attention.

Being a victim myself,
I consciously don’t invade anyone else’s.
But is it not the duty of a man,
To make sure they don’t invade mine; the privacy.

The goal of technological advances,
Was to make us more communicable.
But is this communication making any progress?
Or is it just forcing us into diversions?

What this communication is,
Nothing but utterances and blabber.
Diving in the sea of whinging and cryings,
I forgot to care for the one I love most; myself.

Man yelling after intrusion of privacy on call
Photo by Moose Photos on Pexels.com
Skip to toolbar