The world goes on, the world moves as it is. If there is a change that happens that destroys the order in the world, the world destroys it. If it survives, adapts and changes, the world changes, and the order changes. It recurs and some activists fight for the unfair things in the world and the world again fights the activist to remain as it is.

It is the activist that is bothered with the unfair things in the world. And this unfair thing begins personally, it is unfair to the activist first and then they begin to realise there are other people like them who find these things unfair too. It is only then it becomes an activity. The activist carries the guilt of the world, but the world doesn’t carry their guilt. For the world they are just another speck of dust making unnecessary sounds and destroying the order for some logic that has never occurred to anybody.

The origin

Veeru, like all these activists, decided to fight for something he found unfair. It all started with a glass of milk. He was 17 then and he woke up to the cold chills of winter. Hyderabad is funny, the temperature during nights and early mornings are single digits but the afternoons burn your skin. 

He woke up feeling a chill in his bones, he wanted to drink something warm. He checked his fridge and found a packet of milk. And he poured it into a vessel and started heating it. As he poured the hot milk into his cup, a thought occurred to his brain. “What is this liquid?” he thought. This liquid which I drink, which I crave to make some chai tea. Without it the tea tastes bad.

He instantly remembers a chapter in his school. “Cow gives us milk” and he told himself that milk is necessary. An essential need of humans. But again “What does this milk give me?”, “Oh! It gives me calcium. So, humans need milk for a lifetime” he sat on his couch sipped some hot milk. He recalled his brother drinking milk from his mother. “Kids need milk” he thought. “Kids need mother’s milk” he corrected himself. He switched his TV on and put National geographic.

There is some documentary about cubs of different cats. “Cats need milk, beings need milk” eh thought as he saw kittens sucking milk from their mother. He clicked next and there’s some another channel of leopards mating. “I have never seen an adult cat drinking milk” he thought. This thought remained and disturbed him for some time. All this time of thinking, he never sipped the milk. “It is a cow tit enzyme” he though. And he couldn’t sip the milk another time. In fact, he felt nauseous and almost puked the milk he drank. “It is weird” he stood up poured the milk back into the vessel.

The Problem

He went out for a walk to divert himself from this disturbing thought of himself sucking milk from a cow. “The grass the cow eats that allows the cow to produce the milk that it produces for its calf. Why am I even drinking it?” he thought. He turned around as a bus honked and his eyes went upon a big billboard. That board has a big poster of a cow smiling while holding a packet milk. “My fresh milk, just for you” the board read. It made him nauseous again.

“If a human ever said that sentence, it would look like a weird fetish” he thought. He could smell cow dung. He looked around and he saw a shelter where there are buffaloes tied up. It was 5 in the morning and a man came holding a tin from the shelter. He sat down and started milking the cow. Veeru looked around and saw a calf looking at all the milk being poured into a tin. “It surely is hungry” he thought. After the man collected enough milk, he let the calf suck remaining milk.

Veeru couldn’t control his urge and went up to the milk man. “The calf looks male” Veeru shouts to the milk man. “Yeah it is” milk man replied while pouring the milk into small tins. “Well, what do you do with it? I mean, it doesn’t give milk” Veeru asks. Milk man smiled and said “We sell it to the dealers, they either sell it to farmers or sell it to the beef factories” he said. Veeru looks at the calf drinking milk from its mother that’s tied to a pole.

The unfair

“It’s unfair” Veeru whispers. “What?” the milk man asked and Veeru turned around and started walking towards his home. “Do we even need milk? Or is it because of these farming industries promoting us to drink milk? No animal drinks milk after growing up. We are animals, right? We are drinking milk for its taste! Not for the need. It is not essential. It is a corporate propaganda for all these people to live by selling milk. But if we understood that we don’t need milk, will we buy milk? It is everyone that is brainwashed and addicted to milk. They told us that it is essential! And now we buy it from them. It is their livelihood”

Veeru stares blankly at the stairs without getting up to his home. “It is us who are paying these people to tie cows, buffaloes, and steal its baby’s food because of the common delusion that we all need milk”. Veeru felt like he found out something big. He was happy that he understood something out of the world; found something unfair to him. He understood that it is unfair anywhere in the world. He set foot on the stairs going above to his floor. And while climbing up these stairs, Veeru knew that he is going to fight for it; that he is going to gather more activists.

Hence the activist!

 He decided to take all the guilt of human race to fight against this common unfairness; wanted to save humanity from the burden of mistreating and stealing the calf’s food. He decided to be an activist. And he wanted to find more people who consider themselves an activist, and just go for it! But the world is already in a structural format of drinking milk. It is an order of the world now. Will the world adapt to Veeru? Will the world take up on his guilt the way he took everyone’s? Or will Veeru remain the speck of dust while we sip milk and kill cows?

Law or flaw?
Judiciary or is some kind of a mockery?
To the brother who’s serving a life sentence;
for the crime he did not do;
That night will forever be of repentance.

The mother who taught him how to walk;
Has got such a shock;
Half of her body is permanently into shock

The father who gifted him his first car;
Is too old & poor to fight
& had to sell the roof which protected them;
From the bright sunlight.

The sister who’s an aspiring lawyer;
Has lost all hopes on the system;
For here innocents are the victims.

And the innocent who is spending his days;
In a 6*6 feet black hole
Is losing the power over his soul;
And for what?
For the doubts in the caste and religion.

So my dear friends,
What and for whom is the evidence?
To be fabricated? To be planted by the money & power holders?
Or for the law to behold the truth?

This poem is a tribute to Mohammad Nisarudin and many more innocents who spend their lives in the jails being the prisoners of the system.


Who was Mohammad Nisarudin and story of few others……

On January 15, 1994, Mohammad Nisarudin was at home in Gulbarga, Karnataka, preparing for his Diploma in Pharmacy final exams, 15 days away. After he qualified, the 19-year-old planned to get a job in one of the Gulf countries, a dream he and his best friend Sajid (name changed) had talked about since they were seven. But that day, the police knocked at the door of his parents’ home and took him away in handcuffs. Initially, the police booked him for a bomb blast that had taken place in October 1993 in a Muslim educational institute in Hyderabad, then he was booked in a few unsolved bomb blasts that had taken place in August and September in 1993, then he was booked under the anti-terror law Terrorist and Disruptive Activities (Prevention) Act (TADA) — which was repealed two years later, in 1996 — for planting the bombs that took two lives and injured 22 in five trains on December 5 and 6 1993 in Mumbai, and after a ‘confession,’ put into Ajmer Central Jail. On February 28, 2005, a TADA court at Ajmer convicted him and gave him a life sentence.
On May 11 2016, the Supreme Court ruled that his confession, which was taken in police custody, was totally inadmissible, acquitted him of all charges and set aside his life sentence.
While the length of Mr Nisarudin’s incarceration is extreme, his isn’t an isolated case.

Take Abdul Wahid Din Mohammad Shaikh, 39 now. He was charged of complicity in the Mumbai train blasts of November 7, 2006 and spent nine years in Arthur Road Jail in Mumbai before being acquitted of all charges — the only one of those accused to be acquitted — and released. Mr. Shaikh told The Hindu that all the accused were made to sign many documents, some of which were blank. “Had I known the consequences I would have never done so.” While in jail, he enrolled in a law course, and finished a course in journalism. If he knew something of the law at the time he was arrested, he said, “I would have known what a confession is, what the consequences of signing on any written or blank pages are, what is the rights of an accused are, what the rights of those arrested are, what the duties of an investigating officer and agency are.”

And there is Adnan Mulla, 40, who was sentenced to 10 years for the Mulund blasts of March 1, 2003. Initially he was illegally detained in 2003 and not released because the police wanted to make him a witness. Then he was made an accused after he refused to give a statement against his brother-in-law of Saquib Nachan (former general secretary of the now-banned Students Islamic Movement of India, SIMI). “I spent six years and one month in jail,” he says. Throughout his incarceration, he was kept in the cell, an egg-shaped high-security block. “I was going to get married the same month I was picked up,” he says. “My fiancée waited for seven years for me to be released. Only I know how much she and both our families suffered. How can the loss of time be compensated by any officer or government?”

Who is the system for? Why is the system even their when they take their own sweet time and do not care for the innocents?

Full story: https://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/mumbai/prisoners-of-the-system/article17333262.ece

From a single formed life organism to the complex human structure, from killing to survival to killing for fun, the world has always been a chaotic place. If you think 2020 lockdown is making your life hard, I must say you are going to have a huge reality check in this article. 

If there is any external issue affecting your life like someone threatening you, giving rape threats, giving murder threats, racist comments, abuses from a stranger or it may be anything the first thing that comes to the mind is legal help is the first thing that comes to your mind, and that is awesome.

But there is a killing generally done by the government without the final say of the court, constitution or any security body of the country. It is called “Extrajudicial killing.” 

Extrajudicial Killing: An extrajudicial killing (also known as extrajudicial execution) is the killing of a person by governmental authorities without the sanction of any judicial proceeding or legal process. They often target political, trade union, dissident, religious and social figures.

In the world of 195 countries where most of them are governed with democracy, this practice violates the fundamental human rights that come with democracy and the respective constitutions of the nations. So how is this a bad practice to democracy? Let us find out.

When a crime happens, the general procedure is to take the accused to court, submit proofs, and if found guilty, the punishments are given based on the offence. The person should not be even called a “Criminal” until proven in court; they are called “accused.”

In extrajudicial killing, The investigation hardly takes place; there is not even the formal complaint filed. It straight away violates the human rights of individuals, denying them any opportunity of contacting their legal representatives or lawyers.

By this, we cannot know the story of the person who is accused. The procedure of giving punishment is only with the judiciary, and no one can intervene in this. When the government takes the law procedure of giving sentences to hand, it the violation of the law and even the government cant be held accountable and be punished. 

There are many incidents in which innocent people lost their life due to this. The history of extrajudicial killing goes back to famous People like Julies César. During the civil war, there is a term used as ‘lynching’. Lynching is an extrajudicial killing carried out by a mob a, often by hanging, but also by burning at the stake or shooting.

The obstacles to end this are not something impossible but achievable. Various factors affect extrajudicial killing. There are specific prerequisites and prevention programs in most countries, but there is no definite law prohibiting unlawful killings from preventing this kind of human rights violation.

Yes, the judiciary system might be slow in handling a few cases as it might need more concrete proofs to pass a judgment. That doesn’t mean the government can take the law into the hand and pass out assessments. Imagine what the everyday citizen would think? It would always send a wrong message to the citizens regarding the law.

Many honorary bodies like the United Nations and International Human Rights Commission have condemned this act. They have taken up many unique programmes to spread awareness on this and stop this. Their efforts are going strong, but the results are not very promising. 

The government should stop interfering in judicial affairs, and there must be strong law implemented, where if the government interferes a stringent action must be taken like dissolving the government. Then these activities will come to a halt. 

Let us hope that these come to an end as soon as possible and everyone gets equal justice.

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