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LOCKDOWN READING: good books that makes your time fly!

It’s already been seven month of lockdown and obviously most of us got bored of watching series. Many are searching for the good books to catchup in the lockdown. Reading is one of the best methods to ease your mind and plunge into an all-encompassing story. Whether it’s before the bed to relax or throughout your day to fill the time, reading is an enjoyable hobby that everyone can partake. Let’s dive into some interesting books you can give a try in the lockdown. With some ancient, some latest, and some in-between, you will be able to find an excellent literary option for your flavors.

Steal Like an Artist:

Best Books 2020 - 6

“Steal Like an Artist” by Austin is essential and required reading for all the artists, despite the type of art you create. This eye-catching little book, visually stimulating read, “Steal Like an Artist” is an excellent pick. This square book makes a perfect addition to any coffee table with its attractive, minimalist look and small size. It’s one of the best-picked books of 2020 with its hopeful message. Moreover, It’s a quick read that you can complete in one session, but the advice and ideas it holds will stay with you long after you have set it down.

Some of the Austin’s ideas will validate on what you’re already doing; some will stimulate you to change a creative practice centrally; others will encourage you to grab a notebook and get to act immediately.

Sita’s Sister:

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“Sita’s Sister” from the Indian author Kavita Kane, is about Urmila, the ignored wife of Lakshman, Sita’s sister and one of the most excused characters in the Ramayana. It is a brave re-creation of mythology, which presents us with a subaltern perspective. It seems to be addressed in response to Lakshman’s question – “O Urmila! Will the world ever know of your emotional pain, your eternal sacrifice?” yet it is not just her variant.

It goes with a brilliant narration about the best rendition to Ramayan from the worst-hit woman of Ramayan. Urmila has got all in her as tones, muted over the canvas of living. She is portrayed as a fierce princess in love, joyful bride, anxious wife and determined woman who did not try to impose herself on her husband to become his distraction.

If you are in search of knowing the stories of some overlooked female characters in mythology then books by Kavita are the best suggestions to catchup in the lockdown.

State Of Wonder:

books to read during lockdown

“State Of Wonder” by Ann Patchett is the novel that makes you refuse to move until you finish the entire chapter even though you made your mind not to get deep into it.

It feels mystical when a story takes you into the intensities of the Amazon rain forest of Brazil, where the civilization doesn’t exist ( tribes and their cultures are what does). Moreover, it becomes much interesting because it all about the two doctors, both females are entwined in a medical research mystery. Though the end was a bit rushed, the entire story is so dazzling, and it’s like a meaty collection of ethical questions.

*This book is shortlisted for orange books 2012.

A Man Called Ove:

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If you feel like catching up with a book of comedy and solitude, then the best choice would be “A Man Called Ove” by Fredrik Backman. It all about how an irritable yet loveable man finds his solitary world changed on its head when a boisterous modern family moves in next door. Fredrik explains on the point of “how healing can happen with the strangest people in the strangest ways”, in a fantastic way!

Born a Crime:

books to read during lockdown

“Born a Crime” by Trevor Noah, is about his life growing up as a mixed-race child in pre-apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa. It also includes the story of that child’s relationship with his bold, revolutionary, and fervently religious mother; whose is his teammate so determined to save her son from the circle of violence, poverty and abuse. It gives insights of abusement during apartheid as marriage, and sexual relations between black and white South Africans were illegal.

But in the end, be prepared to fall just a little bit in love with his loving mother. And one can easily believe that “the quickest and impactful way to bridge the race gap is by the language” after reading this book.

These are few suggestions and yet more to come in future. It’s your turn to catch up with these good reads to make your day go smoothly with a little warmth, little love, little sadness, comedy and finally a wholesome peace of mind.

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